30 Simple Kindergarten Science Experiments

If there is one thing I can say with confidence, it’s this – capturing (and keeping) the attention of a kindergarten class isn’t always easy.

Luckily, science experiments are one thing that always seem to peak the interest of young kids.

This guide covers 30 simple kindergarten science experiments that you kids will love! For each experiment, we’ve detail exactly what you’ll need, how to run the experiment, and what your kids will learn.

kindergarten science experiments

1. Lava Lamps

Supplies

  • Vegetable Oil
  • Water
  • Food Coloring
  • Alka Seltzer (broken into pieces)
  • Cups

How to create the experiment

  • Pour ½ cup of water into a glass and add food coloring
  • Fill another glass ¾ full of vegetable oil
  • Pour the colored water into the vegetable oil cup until the liquid is 1-2 inches from the top
  • Add Alka Seltzer to the cup
  • The oil and water do not mix, so the oil will not change color
  • The Alka Seltzer and the water react together to make carbon dioxide bubbles

What students will learn

  • The differences between oil and water

2. Color Changing Liquid

Supplies

  • Milk
  • Food Coloring
  • Dish Soap
  • Q-tip
  • Pie pan (or similar)

How to create the experiment

  • Pour milk into pan
  • Put drops of food coloring into the milk, but do not mix them
  • Dip a Q-tip into dish soap
  • Dip the Q-tip into the milk

What students will learn

  • The Q-tip will change the colors of the milk and food coloring
  • A great way to teach students about primary and secondary colors

3. Baking Soda Volcano

Supplies

  • Large plate
  • Mason jar or soda bottle
  • Playdough
  • 2 tablespoons baking soda
  • Dish soap
  • Red food coloring
  • Vinegar
  • Warm water

How to create the experiment

  • Wrap the bottle with playdough
  • Mix the warm water with the red food coloring and then pour it into the bottle
  • Add six drops of dish soap, the baking soda, and vinegar
  • The volcano will “erupt” out of the top of the bottle

What students will learn

  • How chemicals react with one another
  • What volcanos look like

4. Homemade Slime

Supplies

  • Borax
  • Water
  • 4 ounces of glue
  • Two Bowls
  • Food coloring (optional)
  • Measuring cup

How to create the experiment

  • Pure glue into a bowl
  • Stir ½ cup of water into the glue
  • Add food coloring (optional)
  • In the second bowl mix 1 cup of water and 1 teaspoon of borax
  • Slowly stir the glue mixture into the borax solution, it will start turning into slime. Knead and mix it with your hands to help it form

What students will learn

  • How chemicals react with one another
  • How colors mix (optional)

5. Using Sunscreen

Supplies

  • Sunscreen lotion (not spray)
  • Two pieces of black construction paper

How to create the experiment

  • Take one piece of black construction paper and set it aside
  • Take the second piece and place a small blob of sunscreen on the paper
  • Smear the sunscreen on the second paper
  • Place both pieces of paper outside in direct sunlight for several hours
  • Collect and examine both papers (students will see that the sunscreen protected the second sheet of paper, but the first sheet faded)

What students will learn

  • The importance of wearing sunscreen
  • How the sun changes material

6. Making Rain Clouds

Supplies

  • Large jar
  • Shaving cream
  • Food coloring
  • Pipettes
  • Small cup

How to create the experiment

  • Mix the food coloring and water in the small cup, place a pipette in the cup
  • Fill the large jar ¾ full with water and add shaving cream on top
  • Use the pipette to drop some of the colored water onto the shaving cream
  • Observe what happens (the colored water will begin seeping down into the water, simulating rain from a cloud

What students will learn

  • Color mixing
  • How precipitation works

7. Making Rock Candy

Supplies

  • 3 cups of sugar
  • 1 cup of water
  • Wooden skewers
  • Jars
  • Large saucepan
  • Clothespins
  • Food coloring (optional)
  • Candy flavoring (optional)

How to create the experiment

  • Combine equal parts of sugar and water in a saucepan. Heat until all the sugar has dissolved.
  • Slowly add more sugar and mix until the sugar will no longer dissolve (the water will be cloudy)
  • Add candy flavoring (optional)
  • Bring water and sugar mixture to a simmer, then remove from heat and cool
  • Dip the wooden skewers in water and then roll in sugar, set them aside to dry
  • After the mixture has cooled pour it into jars and add food coloring (optional)
  • Suspend the skewers in the mixture, using the clothespins to prevent the skewers from touching the sides or bottom of the jar
  • Observe the jars for a week, each day more rock candy will adhere to the skewer

What students will learn

  • How sugar solutions work
  • Patience and taking time to conduct experiments

8. Homemade Ice Cream

Supplies

  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • ½ cup of milk
  • ¼ teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 6 tablespoons kosher or rock salt
  • Ice
  • Gallon sized Ziploc bags
  • Pint sized Ziploc bags
  • Bowl

How to create the experiment

  • Fill the gallon bag half way with ice
  • Mix the salt into the bag, covering the ice with salt
  • Pour milk, sugar, and vanilla extract into a bowl, mix together. Then pour into a pint bag
  • Carefully seal the bag closed
  • Bury the pint bag in gallon bag and then seal the gallon bag closed
  • Shake the bag for five minutes
  • Open the gallon bag and remove the pint bag, which will have formed into ice cream

What students will learn

  • How salt and ice interact
  • How liquids can turn into solids

9. Grow a Bean

Supplies

  • Bean seeds
  • Jars
  • Paper towel or napkin
  • Water

How to create the experiment

  • Pour some water into a jar and swirl it around
  • Fold the paper towel or napkin and place it in the jar, absorbing the water until it is damp
  • Place the bean seed into the jar, resting it on the napkin
  • Spray additional water on the bean every few days
  • After a few days, roots will begin emerging from the seed

What students will learn

  • How plants grow from seeds
  • The process of germination and the amount of time that it takes
  • How to care for plants

10. Digging for Dinosaur Bones

Supplies

  • Cornstarch
  • Water
  • Dinosaur toys or fossil skeletons
  • Shovels or picks (for excavation) 

How to create the experiment

  • Mix cornstarch and water together, using about twice as much cornstarch. If it is to thick add more water, if it is to soupy add more cornstarch
  • Place the dinosaurs into the mixture. Push them down until they are completely buried.
  • Place the mixture into the sun for 1-2 days. Once it has gotten very hard and begun to crack it will be ready to use.
  • Excavate the dinosaur using shovels or picks

What students will learn

  • How dinosaurs are buried and turn into fossils
  • How paleontologists uncover fossils

11. Heating and Melting Experiment

Supplies

  • A muffin tin or similar small containers
  • Assorted objects that might melt. Allow students to select items that they think might melt in the sun.

How to create the experiment

  • Place each object into an individual muffin tin
  • Place outside in the sun and set a timer. Allow students to choose how long to set the timer for.
  • When the timer goes off check the muffin tin and observe what objects have changed, especially which objects have melted.
  • *Experiment can be repeated using different items, leaving items exposed to the sun for longer periods of time, or different types of muffin tins such as metal vs. silicon.

What students will learn

  • Which objects melt at low levels of heat and which require higher levels of heat
  • The impact that the sun has on warming the Earth

12. Density Experiment

Supplies

  • Sink, fish tank, or other large container that can hold water
  • Assorted objects that might sink or float. Allow students to select items that they think might sink or float

How to create the experiment

  • Fill the container with water
  • Place items in the water and observe what happens. If there is no change right away, leave items in the water to see if they sink after being in the water for a longer period of time.

What students will learn

  • How the weight and material an object is made out of impacts whether it will sink or float
  • How water absorbs into some material

13. Music with Water

Supplies

  • Cups
  • Water
  • Variety of ‘drum sticks’ such as metal spoons, wooden spoons, straws, etc.

How to create the experiment

  • Fill each cup with different amounts of water. If you want you can measure out specific amounts of water.
  • One at a time, place each ‘drum stick’ in the glass and use it to tap on the glass
  • Observe what happens. Some ‘drum sticks’ will be louder than others. How does the amount of water in a glass impact the pitch?

What students will learn

  • Pitch
  • The way sound moves through water
  • How different materials impact sound

14. Light Refraction

Supplies

  • Sticky note
  • Marker
  • Clear water bottle
  • Water

How to create the experiment

  • Draw two arrows going opposite directions on the sticky note and place the note on the wall
  • Fill the water bottle with water
  • Hold the water bottle up to the sticky note and move it back and forth in front of the arrows
  • The arrows will appear to change the direction that they are pointing in

What students will learn

  • How water and light interact with each other
  • How objects in water can be different than they appear.

15. How birds stay dry

Supplies

  • Coloring sheets (preferably of birds)
  • Wax crayons
  • Spray bottle
  • Water
  • Food coloring (optional, to make water easier to see) 

How to create the experiment

  • Hand out coloring sheets and crayons, have students color
  • While students are coloring, fill spray bottle with water and add food coloring
  • Once they have finished coloring, lightly spray the colored areas with water
  • Student will observe that the wax from the crayons prevents the water from sinking into the paper

What students will learn

  • That just like the wax from crayons, the oil in a bird’s feathers helps them keep dry and warm in a storm

16. Invisible Ink

Supplies

  • A lemon, cut in half
  • Water
  • Spoon
  • Q-tips
  • Bowl
  • White paper
  • Lamp or other source of light you can move around

How to create the experiment

  • Squeeze some lemon juice into a bowl and add a few drops of water
  • Mix the water and lemon together with a spoon
  • Dip the Q-tip into the mixture and then use it to write a message on the white paper
  • When the mixture dries it will become invisible. To view it again, hold the paper up close to a light to heat it

What students will learn

  • How lemon juice interacts with light and water
  • How people are able to send secret messages

17. How Mold Grows

Supplies

  • Several pieces of bread
  • Ziploc bags

How to create the experiment

  • Place a piece of bread into each bag and label it with the date
  • Observe the bread and what it looks like
  • Place each bag in a different environment, such as a dark closet, brightly lit room, in the refrigerator, in the freezer, etc.
  • Check each day and make observations about what the bread looks like and when it begins growing mold

What students will learn

  • Students will learn how mold forms and what kinds of environments it is most likely to grow in

18. Does it Dissolve?

Supplies

  • Small bowls
  • Notecards
  • Marker
  • Items to dissolve, such as flour, sugar, dirt, rice. Items can vary.
  • Measuring cup

How to create the experiment

  • Measure out the same amount of each item and place each in a small bowl
  • Label each item on a notecard and place next to the bowl
  • Add the same amount of water to each bowl
  • Observe what happens. Which items dissolve and which do not? Do things change over time?

What students will learn

  • Which items can dissolve in water and which do not

19. Icy Roads

Supplies

  • Two sheet pans
  • Water
  • Salt
  • Hair dryer
  • Model cars

How to create the experiment

  • Place water on each sheet pan and freeze the pans
  • Take sheet pans out of the freezer, cover one with salt and leave the other plain
  • Drive the model cars on each sheet pan, observe what happens. Is it easier to drive on the salted ice?
  • Hold the hair dryer above each pan and set a timer. Does the pan with the salt melt faster than the pan without salt?

What students will learn

  • How salt impacts the way ice melts
  • Why we use salt on the roads in the winter

20. Walking Water

Supplies

  • Three jars of the same size and height
  • Paper towels or toilet paper (the less absorbent the better)
  • Water
  • Food coloring

How to create the experiment

  • Fill two jars ¾ full of water. Put different food coloring in each jar
  • Line the three jars up, with the empty jar in the center
  • Create an M shape out of the paper towel. Place one leg in the first jar, the center part in the empty jar, and the second leg in the third jar. The toilet paper in the empty jar should be U shaped.
  • Make observations on the changes that occur. The water in each jar will move up the paper towel, eventually dripping into the empty jar

What students will learn

  • How material absorbs water
  • How water can move as it absorbs into a material

21. Why Leaves Change Color

Supplies

  • Three leaves from the same tree
  • Rubbing alcohol
  • Jar
  • Spoon
  • Plastic wrap
  • Scissors
  • Coffee filter
  • Bowl
  • Timer

How to create the experiment

  • Break the leaves into small pieces and out them in the jar
  • Pour rubbing alcohol over the pieces, just covering them
  • Mash the leaves into the rubbing alcohol
  • Place the plastic wrap over the top of the jar
  • Place the jar into the bowl, pour hot water into the bowl
  • Let everything sit for 30 minutes, swishing the jar sometimes. The alcohol should turn dark green.
  • Cut a strip from the coffee filter and place it so one end is in the alcohol and the other resting at the top of the jar
  • The liquid will move up the coffee filter and the colors will separate out as the alcohol slowly evaporates off of the coffee filter

What students will learn

  • How leaves change color

22. Melting Times and Solar Energy

Supplies

  • Ice cubes that are all the same size and shape
  • Different colored construction paper. At least one black and one white, as well as a few other colors

How to create the experiment

  • Go outside on a sunny day
  • Place each piece of paper on the ground and place an ice cube in the center of each paper
  • Observe how quickly the ice melts on each color

What students will learn

  • How melting times vary depending on what color the ice is placed on
  • How solar energy works and interacts with the environment on Earth

23. Turning Pennies Green

Supplies

  • Cooper pennies
  • White vinegar
  • Bowl
  • Paper towel

How to create the experiment

  • Place the paper towel in the bowl and place the pennies on top of the paper towel
  • Pour vinegar over the pennies until the paper towel has absorbed all of it
  • Observe the pennies over the next several days, overtime the pennies will turn green

What students will learn

  • The cooper in the pennies and the vinegar react to turn the pennies green
  • How basic chemical reactions work

24. Expanding Soap

Supplies

  • Ivory Soap (must be ivory soap due to its high air content)
  • Microwavable plate
  • Microwave

How to create the experiment

  • Allow students to examine the bar of soap
  • Place soap in the microwave, and ‘cook’ on high for 1-2 minutes
  • Allow students to watch through the microwave window as the soap expands
  • After it has finished expanding, take soap out and allow it to cool before students can examine it

What students will learn

  • How air expands as it heats up, changing the objects it is contained in

25. Water Displacement

Supplies

  • Clear water pitcher with a large opening
  • Stones, rocks, or other objects that will sink
  • Permanent marker
  • Water

How to create the experiment

  • Fill the pitcher half way with water and use the marker to record the water label
  • Place objects in the water, observe what happens to the water level
  • Use a variety of objects, which causes the greatest change to the water level?

What students will learn

  • How water levels change and how water is displaced

26. Making Raisins

Supplies

  • Grapes
  • Plate

How to create the experiment

  • Place ripe grapes on a plate
  • Observe every few days what changes can be observed in the grapes
  • Over the course of roughly two months (depending on the environment that the grapes are placed in) the grapes will turn into raisins

What students will learn

  • How foods change over time

27. Coloring Daisies

Supplies

  • White daisies
  • Jars or vases
  • Food Coloring
  • Water

How to create the experiment

  • Add water to each vase and place a different color of food coloring in each vase
  • Add daisies to the water (the shorter the stems the quicker the experiment will work)
  • Observe as the food coloring is absorbed and changes the color of the daisies

What students will learn

  • How water is absorbed by plants
  • How dye alters flowers

28. Mirror Reflections

Supplies

  • Mirrors, two for each student or group of students
  • Letters or signs of some sort
  • Pencil
  • Paper

How to create the experiment

  • Face two mirrors towards each other and explore what happens
  • Place letters or signs in front of one mirror and observe what happens
  • Students can write out their own signs and hold them up to the mirror

What students will learn

  • How light bounces off of mirrors
  • How mirrors alter how you view the world

29. Dancing Raisins

Supplies

  • Raisins
  • Two clear glasses
  • Carbonated water
  • Tap water

How to create the experiment

  • Pour the tap water in one glass and the carbonated water in the other glass
  • Place raisins in both glasses and observe what happens (the raisins in the carbonated water will ‘dance,’ the ones in the tap water will not)

What students will learn

  • The differences between carbonated water and tap water

30. Pinecone Bird Feeders

Supplies

  • Pinecones
  • Peanut butter
  • Bird seed
  • String
  • Bowls

How to create the experiment

  • Place the peanut butter and birdseed in separate bowls
  • Roll the pinecones in the peanut butter
  • Roll the peanut butter pinecone in bird seed, shake extra seed into the bowl
  • Let them dry and then use a string to hang the pinecone outside
  • Observe what happens. Does it attract certain animals and not others? The experiment can be repeated with different types of nut butter and/or different bird seed

What students will learn

  • What birds and other neighborhood animals eat
  • How different animals eat different types of food

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